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Torah Portion


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Torah Portion: Shemot




P A R A S H A T Shemot
Exodus 1:1-6:1

http://learn.jtsa.edu/topics/parashah/jpstext/shemot.shtml




Torah Portion: Sh'Mos
EXODUS 1:1 - 6:1

1. MOSES GREW UP, WENT OUT AND SAW THE SUFFERING OF HIS PEOPLE. ONE DAY, HE SAW AN EGYPTIAN BEATING ONE OF HIS FELLOW JEWS. MOSHE KILLED THE EGYPTIAN. PHARAOH HEARD ABOUT IT AND WANTED TO KILL HIM. (2:9-15)

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Shabbat Parashat Shemot
January 20, 2000 - 25 Tevet 5761
Standing on Holy Ground
By: Rabbi Bradley Shavit Artson

Every place is not the same. Intuitively, we have a sense that there are distinctions of space that are just as fundamental to human identity as are distinctions in time. When we enter the elevated vaults of a Gothic cathedral, marvel at the staggering beauty of the Grand Canyon, or shrink under the lofty heights of a New York skyscraper, we respond distinctly to different spaces. Not all places are alike. But is the distinction between one place and another something intrinsic to the place itself, or the result of perceiving different meanings in different places? Would there be different places if there were no different viewers?

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Parshat Shmot, the first chapter of the Book of Exodus

How is that possible? It might be possible to understand that this new ruler of Egypt didn't know who Joseph was, but even that is a bit of a stretch. Can you imagine George W. not knowing who David Ben Gurion was? Well, maybe that's not so hard to imagine, but you get the point! Rashi explains this verse to mean that Pharaoh pretended not to know about the good merits of Joseph and the positive legacy he left for the Hebrew nation.

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Shemot
Exodus 1:1 - 5:26
by Rabbi Joshua Heller

In first few chapters of Exodus, the Egyptian Pharaoh enacts harsh decrees to curtail the fertility and fecundity of the Jewish people (Exodus1:9), "pen yirbeh" - lest the Jews multiply. His increasingly genocidal decrees are thwarted by increasingly heroic women. Last, and perhaps most daring of all, is Pharaoh's daughter, who adopts the young foundling Moses right under her father's nose, even though she knows that all Egyptians have been commanded to kill any male Jewish baby.

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V'ALEH SHMOT, "And these are the names" (of the children of Israel)
EX.1:1- 6:1
by Yaakov Fogelman

Rav Mordecai Gafni stresses that the Torah, the O.T. (Only Testament), while so much more than a mere work of great literature, is also the greatest work of literature, God being its Awesome Almighty Author. Besides being the world's most popular book of all times, a careful reading of it as literature will both reveal many of its deepest messages and cultivate our own literary talents. Rav Gafni notes that Exodus opens with a stress on Israel's names, homes and families, and their links to Yaakov, to their Divine tradition.

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Drasha - Parshas Shmos - Tough Love
by Rabbi Mordechai Kamenetzky

Moshe, the humblest man who was ever on the face of this earth, the man who consistently pleaded with Hashem to spare the Jewish nation from his wrath, emerges this week for the very first time.
First impressions are almost always last impressions, so I wondered what are Moshe's first actions? Surely they would typify his future distinction.

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Torat Hayim
Sh'mot, Exodus 1:1- 6:1
Shabbat January 20, 2001 / 25 Tevet 5761
by Pamela Wax

"When she could hide him no longer, she got a wicker basket [tevat gomeh] for him and caulked it with bitumen and pitch. She put the child into it and placed it among the reeds [suf] by the bank of the Nile." (Exodus 2:3)
The image in Parashat Sh'mot comes readily to mind: a basket, a baby, bulrushes. My own earliest Jewish memory is coloring a mimeograph of the baby Moses, buoyed in his ark among the reeds of the River Nile.

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Torah Portion: Shemot
January 19, 2001 24 Tevet, 5761
Rabbi Stephen M Wylen

Moses said to God, "When I come to the Israelites and say to them: ‘Your ancestral God has sent me to you' and they ask me ‘What is His name?' what shall I say to them?" God said to Moses, "Ehyeh-asher-Ehyeh" (variously translated as "I am what I am" or "I am whatever I will be", etc.). God continued, "Thus shall you say to the Israelites, "Ehyeh sent me to you." (Exodus 3:13-14)

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Shabbat Parshas Shemos
Yeshaya 27:6 - 28:13, 29:22
by Rabbi Dovid Siegel

This week's haftorah displays the true potential of the Jewish people and their unlimited ability. The prophet Yeshaya opens with a descriptive expression about the Jewish exile and exodus from Egypt. He states, "Those who are coming will strike roots as Yaakov and will blossom and bud as Yisroel." (27:6)

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